Awards Winners and Finalists Presented in 2003

The Deadline Club is pleased to announce the winners in the 2003 Annual Awards Contest, which honors excellence in journalism in 2002. The Deadline Club Awards recognize the best in New York area journalism – printed, broadcast or otherwise distributed. Winners were announced at the Annual Awards Dinner at the Marriott Marquis in Times Square on May 22, 2003. The evening featured a keynote address by Mariane Pearl, presenting the first Daniel Pearl Award, named for her late husband.

 

Daniel Pearl Award for Investigative Reporting

Newspapers / News Agencies over 100,000 circulation

 

Winner
Wall Street Journal, Alan Cullison and Andrew Higgins, “Al Qaeda”
Presented by Mariane Pearl, widow of Daniel Pearl

Best Spot News Reporting

Newspapers / News Agencies over 100,000 circulation

 

Winner
Wall Street Journal, Staff, “Paper Trail”
Judges’ Comments:
The level of reporting, detail and the number of people the reporters interviewed in one day was impressive. The story was especially easy to follow despite the complex issues being discussed.

Best Feature Reporting

Newspapers / News Agencies over 100,000 circulation

 

Winner
New York Times, Jim Dwyer, Eric Lipton, Kevin Flynn, James Glanz and Ford Fessenden, “Fighting to Live as the Towers Died”
Judges’ Comments:
This story was a remarkable undertaking that gave the most comprehensive and chilling account of what went on inside the Twin Towers after the terrorist attacks and before the buildings collapsed. This was an emotional story to read and undoubtedly was a gut-wrenching one to report. It was truly amazing work.

Best Reporting

Newspapers / News Agencies under 100,000 circulation

 

Winner
Herald News, Giada Cardoletti, “Marcal Posing Health Hazard”
Judges’ Comments:
Giada Cardoletti’s story on PCB pollution skillfully uncovers the stunning lack of oversight by the state agency charged with protecting citizens’ air quality.

Best Reporting

Non-daily Newspapers

 

Winner
Village Voice , Michael Kamber, “Heroin (and Heartache)”
Judges’ Comments:
“Heroin (and heartache)” was indeed a fresh take on a familiar topic. By winning the trust of this weary group of young people and through his in-the-trenches reporting, Michael Kamber tells a compelling tale that leaves the reader wanting to know more.

Best News, Series or Investigative Reporting

Magazines

 

Winner
Newsweek, Michael Isikoff, Daniel Klaidman, Evan Thomas and team, “9/11 Intelligence Failures”
Judges’ Comments:
Newsweek’s exhaustively researched stories revealed how American intelligence failed to detect the movements of the hijackers before the September 11th attacks and shed all light on the disturbing connection between the Saudi Royal family and terrorists.

Best Feature Reporting

Magazines

 

Winner
Newsweek, Joshua Hammer and team, “The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict”
Judges’ Comments:
This three-article entry demonstrates great depth of reporting, stylish writing and emotional impact, while remaining fresh and immediate on what were the obviously tight deadlines.

Best Editorial Writing

Editorials and Columns

 

Winner
Newsday, Joseph Dolman, “Ground Zero”
Judges’ Comments:
Often editorial writers spin their columns off of reporting in the news pages. But in a series of editorials on rebuilding the World Trade Center site, Newsday’s Joseph Dolman, did a lot of homework on his own. He warned against myopic thinking in rebuilding the site and instead spelled out a visionary plan that would economically benefit the entire region.

Best Personal Column

Editorials and Columns

 

Winner
The Record, Mike Kelly, “The Secret of Father Judge”
Judges’ Comments:
Mike Kelly uses a Vatican statement against ordaining gay men as priests to write a moving final tribute to Father Mychal Judge, the Fire Department chaplain killed at the Twin Towers and an openly gay man. Kelly’s graceful style and broad reach make this column and his others compelling reading.

Best Editorial Cartoon

Editorials and Columns

 

Winner
The Journal News, Matt Davies, “Indian Point”
Judges’ Comments:
Matt Davies showed independent thinking and demonstrated a subtle restraint. Mr. Davies’ thought-provoking cartoon was rendered especially skillfully. He exhibited an extra degree of creativity and artistic execution by cleverly creating his smoke-filled sky with words, fear upon fear upon fear, forcing the reader to take a closer look and to discover the nature of the pollution and the point at issue.
Sports

Best Spot News Reporting / Print

Editorials and Columns

 

Winner
Newsweek, Sharon Begley, Mark Starr and team, “The Sleazy Side of Skating.”
Judges’ Comments:
Newsweek’s team captured the drama and intrigue of the Olympic skating scandal and didn’t stop there. They laid bare the historic causes of corruption in the judging system and showed how it has tainted the sport for generations.

Best Feature Reporting / Print

Winner
Journal News, Ian O’Connor, “A Real Winner”
Judges’ Comments:
O’Connor gives the reader a real feel for Patrick Ewing’s grit in the face of adversity. The column reveals hardships he and his family endured as immigrants from Jamaica and the racial taunts and tensions he faced as a high school basketball player in Boston. O’Connor’s interviews with Ewing’s father and brother and their anecdotes – especially those about his mother’s stoicism – bring grace and life to the story.

Best Reporting

Radio

 

Winner
No Award

Best Spot News Reporting

Television

 

Winner
No Award

Best Series / Investigative Reporting

Television

 

Winner
Inside Edition, Matt Meagher, Cindy Galli, Matt Yule, Robert Read and Charles Lachman, “Kiddy Clubs”
Judges’ Comments:
Inside Edition’s “Kiddie Club” investigation of underage alcohol-free night clubs serves as an alarm for unsuspecting parents. The piece, using producers equipped with undercover cameras, graphically illustrates the many dangers teenagers are exposed to in those clubs, which parents have incorrectly assumed are safe.

Best Feature Reporting

Television

 

Winner
CN8 News Comcast, Keith Taylor, “Autism- The Adam Jones Story”
Judges’ Comments:
In a very competitive field of entries, Keith Taylor’s gripping story of Adam Jones, a five-year-old boy living with Autism, immediately caught our attention through the exceptional use of home video and interviews. The writing, editing and structure of the piece were compelling and thoughtful. The piece serves as an inspiration for all families living with disabilities.

Best Spot News Photo

Photography

 

Winner
Associated Press, David Guttenfelder, “Funeral”
Judges’ Comments:
This stunning photograph showed a modern day Greek Tragedy in Israel – the stoic soldier, the grieving widow, her heart breaking and seemingly about to rip own her clothes in her anguish.

Best Feature Photo

Photography

 

Winner
Associated Press, Sergei Grits, “Afghanistan Refugees”
Judges’ Comments:
This photograph has timeless appeal, showing a refugee camp Madonna. You see a mother in traditional Afghan garb and a child with a colorful and eclectic costume, but no food. A wonderful shot.

Best Sports Photo

Photography

 

Winner
Associated Press, Aris Messinis, “Greece Soccer Violence.”
Judges’ Comments:
We were struck by the concentration of the athletes despite the riots going on between rival fans. Although coins and rocks were hurled at the players, both teams had to focus on winning. The colors and positioning were superb .

Best Business Reporting / Broadcast

Business News

 

Winner
No Award

Best Business Feature Reporting / Print

Business News

 

Winner
Smart Money, Chris Taylor, “Mother’s Little Helpers”
Judges’ Comments:
A clean yet powerful article that uncovers a little known industry that preys on single mothers seeking child support. The story is told from multiple perspectives – ranging from single mothers to collection employees to dads accused of owing support. This is an important piece of journalism.

Best Business News, Series or Investigative Reporting / Print

Business News

 

Winner
Fortune, Richard Behar, “Kidnapped Nation”
Judges’ Comments:
Rarely does a business reporter put his life on the line to get a story. In this case, Richard Behar spent months in Pakistan, interviewing terrorists, thieves, and top politicians – sometimes one and the same – to expose the inside culture and economic underpinnings of a complex, conflicted, and unbelievably corrupt society. His spellbinding personal tale provided a fresh transition from 9/11, illuminating a new and important perspective: the business behind terrorism.

Best Page Design

Page Design / Presentation – over 100,000 circulation

 

Winner
The Record, Robert Townsend and Thomas E. Franklin, “9/11 Anniversary”
Judges’ Comments:
“The Record” produced the most effective use of graphics- It was a simple and elegant way of depicting a horrific day.

Best Page Design / Presentation – under 100,000 circulation

Page Design

 

Winner
Greenwich Time, Dave Lopez, “Skakel Guilty”
Judges’ Comments:
This is a design working hand in glove with breaking news; A crisp, intuitive presentation bringing order and clarity to a seven-story deadline package.

Best Web Site

Winner
Business Week Online
Judges’ Comments:
The BusinessWeek Online site is so packed with information – including a wealth of web-only content – that it is as much of a must-read as the magazine. Its uncluttered and user-friendly design is a model for media websites.

Minority Issues

Winner
The Record,
Elizabeth Llorente, “Journey of Hope Ends in Despair”
Judges’ Comments:
Through persistence, Llorente put a face on an invisible member of the community. Without her work, this story would not exist. Within this category, it was the standout because it used routine journalism tools to develop a story that matters to all communities.

The James Write Brown Public Service Award

Winner
New York Times, Clifford Levy, “Broken Homes”
Judges’ Comments:
A relentless detailed pursuit of the facts and stories of those least able to help themselves, the mentally ill in New York State adult homes, revealed the latest outrages and shortcomings involved in our Society’s neglect. The results of Clifford Levy’s work were numerous proposed changes that in time led to improvement in policies and actions that affected the lives of those who suffered most.

Spread the word. Share this post!