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Sold Out: Hall of Fame at Sardi’s on November 19

Tickets have sold out for The Deadline Club’s 2015 New York Journalism Hall of Fame. Established in 1975 to celebrate The Club’s golden anniversary, the tradition continues on Nov. 19, when a half dozen iconic New York journalists will be inducted in a luncheon ceremony at Sardi’s Restaurant. All six of the honorees plan to be on hand to receive their Hall of Fame medals and speak about their remarkable careers.

The Honorees
(in alphabetical order)

Max Frankel had an illustrious 50-year career with The New York Times, rising from college correspondent to ultimately become the executive editor from 1986 to 1994. Along the way, he reported from such Cold War hotspots as Moscow, Hungary and Cuba before holding many of the top editing posts at the newspaper. He was the Washington bureau chief in 1971, when the Times published the Pentagon papers. In 1973, he won the Pulitzer Prize for coverage of Richard Nixon’s trip to China. He is the author of a memoir, The Times of My Life and My Life with the Times, and High Noon in the Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Juan González has been a staff columnist with The New York Daily News since 1987 and co-host of the syndicated radio and television news program Democracy Now since 1996. His books include Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America; News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media and Fallout: The Environmental Consequences of the World Trade Center Collapse. González has received two George Polk Awards for commentary, and has been named to the Hall of Fame of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.

Charlie Rose is anchor and executive editor of several televised programs. For more than two decades, he has hosted Charlie Rose, a nightly interview show distributed nationally by PBS, which since 2013 has also distributed Charlie Rose: The Week. He has co-hosted CBS This Morning since 2012, and is a contributing correspondent to the network’s 60 Minutes news magazine. Rose, whose television career spans more than four decades, has aired countless interviews with Nobel Laureates, and extraordinary men and women of science, politics, art, business, sports, technology, literature and entertainment. He is the recipient of the Légion d’honneur, numerous awards from the scientific and journalism communities, including four Emmys, and many honorary degrees.

Lesley Stahl is commencing her 25th season as a correspondent for CBS’s 60 Minutes, where her work has included political scoops and insightful foreign reporting, while garnering 11 Emmy awards. Stahl joined CBS News in the Washington bureau in 1972, in the midst of the Watergate coverage, going on to serve as White House correspondent, the first woman to hold that job. She was a moderator of CBS’s Face the Nation, interviewing such newsmakers as George H. W. Bush, Margaret Thatcher, Boris Yeltsin and Yasir Arafat. She is the author of a memoir, Reporting Live. Stahl has won numerous awards, including RTDNA’s 2015 Paul White award for lifetime achievement.

Paul E. Steiger is the executive chairman of ProPublica, after serving as founding editor-in-chief, CEO and president from 2008 through 2012. During 26 years at The Wall Street Journal, he rose to become managing editor from 1991 to 2007. Under his leadership, the Journal won 16 Pulitzer Prizes. He also worked for 15 years at The Los Angeles Times. Steiger is now on the nonprofit boards of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. From 2005 to 2011, he was the chairman of the Committee to Protect Journalists. Honors include the Gerald Loeb Award for lifetime achievement and awards from universities including Columbia, Harvard, Missouri, Kansas, Brandeis, and Arizona.

Richard B. Stolley had a prolific 62-year career with Time Inc., including as Editorial Director, the company’s second highest editorial management position. He worked for 19 years at the weekly Life magazine—serving as bureau chief in Atlanta, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and Paris—before becoming the assistant managing editor. He was the editor of Life in the early 1980s, after it had become a monthly. He is perhaps best remembered for obtaining the famous Zapruder film of John F. Kennedy’s assassination for Life. In 1973, he became the founding editor of People magazine, creating a pioneering new magazine format that has been much copied since. He has received several lifetime achievement awards, including from the American Society of Magazine Editors and the Magazine Publishers of America.